NCAA says Geno call a secondary violation

By Carl Adamec

The NCAA has determined that UConn women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma’s call to Little League baseball star Mo’ne Davis was a secondary rules violation.

“Over the last 24 hours, the University of Connecticut, the American Athletic Conference and the NCAA have been working together to determine whether a violation occurred when head women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma spoke with Mo’ne Davis over the phone during the 2014 Little League World Series,” UConn athletic director Warde Manuel said in a statement. “The NCAA has determined a secondary rules violation of bylaw 13.1.3.1 did occur and while UConn accepts this decision, we do not agree with it.

“Prior to attempting to reach Davis, Coach Auriemma checked with the UConn compliance department and was advised such a call would be permissible since Davis is not considered a prospective student-athlete by the NCAA and the call was to be congratulatory rather than recruiting in nature.

“While UConn will continue to adhere to the NCAA and conference rules, I believe that upon request from a friend to Geno, a proud Philadelphian, to call a young lady representing the City of Brotherly Love who had accomplished historic feats in the Little League World Series, should not constitute a violation especially due to the fact that NCAA rules do not classify Mo’ne as a prospective student-athlete.

“The nature of Coach Auriemma’s two-minute conversation with Mo’ne had nothing to do with recruiting and instead had everything to do with congratulating and encouraging Mo’ne to continued success.

“I consider this matter closed and we will have no further comment.”

While meeting with the media Wednesday at Gampel Pavilion, Auriemma said that an anonymous school had reported him to the  American Athletic Conference concerning his two-minute conversation with Davis, a 13-year-old eighth grader who has said that her dream was to play point guard for the University of Connecticut before moving on to the WNBA.

“That’s the world we live in,” Auriemma said Wednesday with a shake of the head. “It shows you what is wrong not only for things that go on but also with some of the people that I coach against.”

Davis became the first girl to pitch a World Series shutout when she blanked Nashville, Tennessee, in her team’s first game. She also threw a shutout in the Mid-Atlantic Regional final against Newark, Delaware.

When she wasn’t on the field in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, she was shown in the stands wearing a UConn sweatshirt.

During the Series, somebody from the Philadelphia 76ers contacted Auriemma about Davis and he was contacted by the Little League World Series communications department. He called the office where Davis happened to be and she was put on the phone. Numerous media outlets reported that the two had spoken.

Auriemma has never seen Davis play and she’s nowhere to be found on UConn’s recruiting radar. Of course, that may change.

“I have no idea. I have no idea whether the kid’s any good, no good, a superstar or can even reach the basket,” Auriemma said. “I have no idea. No one that I know has seen her play. So I don’t know why that’s a violation.”




6 comments
Norm Bayes
Norm Bayes

From reading this it appears the NCAA and the Uconn compliance dept. are not on the same page.  Geno went through channels and yet is still guilty of a secondary violation.  Very confusing and frustrating.  

Jaden Comeaux
Jaden Comeaux

Why is this news? Geno  did not do this secretively. It was mentioned during a broadcast on national TV during one of her games, and written about in the print media all across the country that he called to congratulate her. I'm sure someone at the AAC conference headquarters had to hear about it. There are 346 teams in 32 conferences plus 4 independent schools at the division 1 level. It's interesting that NONE of the other 349 coaches or AD's had a problem with the call. Whoever the "RAT" that finked on Geno and UConn is, should spend more time focusing on his/her program, than worrying about what other programs are doing. UConn DID NOT gain an advantage of any kind because of that call. Does anyone think that that lodging a complaint against Geno is going to cost them (UConn) any games this season?...No. Do you think it's going to cost UConn any future recruits in the near future?...No. Do you think it's going to keep Geno up at night?...No.


Remember what Geno said during a news conference in Nashville during the final four games. When asked his thoughts about what Muffit McGraw said when she made some disparaging remarks about him and the UConn program. He said "If it's not happening between the lines, I couldn't care less". There are a lot of "squirrels" in the coaching ranks. I was quite surprised when I heard the news that the NCAA deemed this a secondary violation. I hope that whoever "ratted" on Geno checked their own institution first, to make sure it was squeaky clean, and that there where no violations being committed by any of it 's programs. If you dig deep enough, you can find a violation(s) at every division 1 school. No school is 100% squeaky clean. So....what should the penalty be for the violation? Incarceration?, Loss of scholarship(s), Probation ?, Monetary fine?, Written or verbal reprimand?...what? You tell me. I'm sure this won't be the last accusation against the huskies. There's always someone looking to take a pot shot at, or embarrass the program. I guess that's the price you pay for being number 1, and having a large target on your back. Last question....if the women's basketball coach at St.Joseph's or Temple University (Local colleges in Mo'Ne's hometown of Philadelphia) had called, would they have been turned in??? What do you think?

Don Porter
Don Porter

This is such a foolish matter that I am disgusted that the NCAA is still run by such juvenile delinquents !! 

jimsting10
jimsting10

Of Course Geno ran w/it:“It shows you what is wrong not only for things that go on but also with some of the people that I coach against"

Jaden Comeaux
Jaden Comeaux

Touche' Don. Even though Geno checked with the compliance office at UConn, and they gave him the OK, It appears that he still broke the "LETTER" of the law, not the "SPIRIT" of the law. No one should wonder why the big schools want to break away and form the NCAA and their draconian rules and interpretations. This should NOT be news.

jimsting10
jimsting10

Geno quote:There’s guys playing college basketball driving around in cars that cost > my house & we’re worried phone call that I made?”